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Don’t Miss This JWST Micrometeoroid Mitigation Update

1-minute read
JWST

NASA engineered the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to withstand continual bombardment from dust-sized particles moving at extreme velocities, known as micrometeoroid strikes. To date, JWST is averaging one to two strikes a month.

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Two Anomalous Events in GEO

2-minute read
ODQN-February 2018

The February 2018 edition of Orbital Debris Quarterly News (ODQN) is now available and includes the article "Two Anomalous Events in GEO," republished here.

This issue also includes articles on space debris sensor launch updates, SEM analysis results from post-flight inspection of the PMA-2 cover, a review of the CubeSat study project and a photo feature documenting the Space Debris Sensor installation.

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November Issue of ODQN Now Available

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November 2017 ODQN

Check out the November 2017 issue of Orbital Debris Quarterly News (ODQN).

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MEO Selects Three Florida Locations for Meteor Cameras

3-minute read
Fireball Camera

The Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) selected three new sites, all in Florida, to host All Sky Fireball Network cameras — Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, the Robinson Observatory at the University of Central Florida and the Beach Corrosion Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center. Installation occurred in October.

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August Issue of ODQN Now Available

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ODQN August Issue

The August 2017 edition of the Orbital Debris Quarterly News (ODQN) is now available. The issue includes articles on the discovery of the earliest Delta rocket body fragmentation, space debris sensor updates, benefits of a high Low-Earth Orbit in-situ measurement mission, NASA requirements for debris assessment software reentry risk analysis and conference reports.

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MEO Presents Papers to International Community

5-minute read
Orbital Debris and Meteoroid Depiction

Earlier this year, the Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) presented three papers at the 7th European Conference on Space Debris in Germany, sharing findings and updates related to comparison studies on the damage caused by meteoroids versus Orbital Debris, meteor shower forecasting and NASA’s Meteoroid Engineering Model. 

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It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s a Fireball

3-minute read
Fireball

“What was that bright light in the sky last night?” is a popular question NASA hears from the public and media, and one that the Meteoroid Environment Office, along with its All Sky Fireball Network, does its best to answer, in detail.

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May Issue of ODQN Now Available

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Featured Image of ODQN, Volume 21, Issue 2, May 2017

The May issue of Orbital Debris Quarterly News (ODQN) includes articles on policy updates, personnel, project details and more. 

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Updates to NASA Procedural Requirements for Limiting Orbital Debris

2-minute read
Picture depicting orbital debris

An update to the NASA Procedural Requirements for Limiting Orbital Debris and Evaluating the Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Environment (NPR 8715.6B) was released on February 16, 2017. NPR 8715.6B replaces the previous version, NPR 8715.6A with Change 1, which was released on  May 25, 2012.

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Space Debris Sensor Waiting for Launch

1-minute read
ODQN February 2017

The February 2017 edition of Orbital Debris Quarterly News included the article "Space Debris Sensor Waiting for Launch." Continue reading for the full article. 

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NASA Monitors Perseids to Improve Meteor Forecasting

2-minute read
Perseids

The Perseid meteor shower, which peaks in August of each year, was twice as active in 2016 compared to other years. The Perseids are always a major shower and move at very high speeds, so monitoring is essential for the safety of NASA’s spacecraft as there is great potential for high-energy impacts. Increases in activity, like that seen this year, add additional mission risks.

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