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Policy Changes in Effect for NASA’s Construction Safety Community

2-minute read
Female construction worker

Two recent changes to NASA policy directly affect NASA’s Construction Safety community and its commercial suppliers and contractors. These changes went into effect Feb. 1, 2021. 

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Policy Changes in Effect for NASA’s Construction Safety Community

2-minute read
Female construction worker

Two recent changes to NASA policy directly affect NASA’s Construction Safety community and its commercial suppliers and contractors. These changes went into effect Feb. 1, 2021. 

Read More

NPR 8621.1 D Released

2-minute read
Policies Binder

NASA’s Office of Safety and Mission Assurance released NPR 8621.1D, NASA Procedural Requirements for Mishap and Close Call Reporting, Investigating, and Recordkeeping, effective July 6, 2020. In addition to various administrative changes, the update includes two new chapters focused on commercial launch and aircraft mishaps. 

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SMA Leadership Profile: Grant Watson

8-minute read
Grant Watson Profile

Grant Watson unknowingly spent his entire career preparing for his new role, a role that didn’t even exist until this year. As the director of the newly-formed Institutional Safety Management Division of the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, Watson’s 25 plus years in Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA), as well as his executive role as Langley Research Center’s SMA director, give him the knowledge and experience to succeed.

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Type A, B or High-Visibility Incidents — Who to Call

1-minute read
Phone

When something goes wrong, swift action is often necessary, especially in the case of a severe mishap or high-visibility mishap or close call. Knowing what to do ahead of these incidents can help in the aftermath.

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Improving Mishap Investigations for Human Spaceflight

1-minute read
Commercial Crew Astronauts

After each of NASA’s major mishaps — Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia — the agency investigated the mishap and applied findings to future flights. As spaceflight became safer with the implementation of the lessons learned, mishap investigations also improved from each experience. With NASA preparing to fly three new crewed space vehicles in the coming years, clear understanding of the Mishap Investigation process with regards to Human Spaceflight and the underlying authorities and legal landscape of these investigations becomes paramount. 

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Update to Lifting Devices Standard Now in Effect

1-minute read
Lifting

NASA-STD-8719.9, Lifting Standard went into effect Nov. 2, 2018. The update consisted of slight technical changes, new recommended Lifting Device Equipment Manager minimum requirements and editorial cleanup. Because this standard went through a major revision three years ago, updates to this revision were minor. 

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Updates to NPR 8715.3

2-minute read
NPR8715-3

Updates to Chapters 4, 5 and 8 of NPR 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements went into effect on Aug. 1, 2017. These updates, part of Revision D, met the NASA requirement that ensures policies are updated at least every five years; however, a complete update to the policy is still in the works.

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Learn More: Human Factors in Mishap Investigation

2-minute read
Man With Clipboard

When a mishap or close call occurs, there’s always a human component to consider. It’s not about blame, but rather understanding the circumstances around the incident and how they can be avoided in the future to prevent recurrence.

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Updates to Policy on Mishap and Close Call Reporting, Investigating and Recordkeeping Improve Investigation Process

3-minute read
NPR 8621.1C

Changes to NPR 8621.1, Mishap and Close Call Reporting, Investigating, and Recordkeeping went into effect on May 19, 2016. These updates affect NASA’s process for endorsing and releasing mishap reports following incidents.

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NASA’s Construction Safety Working Group Puts Focus on Fall Protection

4-minute read
CSWG Group Photo 2015

Fall Protection Program administrators from each center joined NASA’s Construction Safety Working Group at Kennedy Space Center June 2-3 to provide valuable input on one of the most dangerous work activities in construction. The group members helped focus this second annual face-to-face on fall protection, including discussions on requirements, rescue plans and training. 

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